Jungle
Chobits: Complete Collection

Chobits

Studio(s): 
Genre: 
On DVD: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2011
Grade:
A-
Discs: 
3
Endcaps...

Originally shown as episodes 9 and 18, Chobits: The Complete Collection includes the original two recap episodes as well as one set two years after the end of the series.

Chobits: The Complete Serie is set in a world where people have persocoms, androids that function as their personal computers and companions for daily life. The series focuses on Hideki Motosuwa, a cram student attempting to pass his college entrance exam. New to the city, he is amazed by the prevalence of persocoms. Walking home, Hideki finds himself wishing he had a persocom of his own. He stumbles upon one in a the garbage and takes her home. Upon booting her up, it is realized that she is devoid of most information, saying only “Chi” and must be taught. Of course, Hideki decides that Chi must be her name.

The series takes on many different issues, which I will not spoil. There are many awkward moments where Hideki finds himself confronted with the beautiful women in his life and his own inability to prevent his reactions and inner dialogue, often to humorous results. The latter half of the series is more serious than the beginnings, making Chobit’s a storyline instead of a collection of misadventures. The various questions raised by the series are often thought provoking and the silly parts are amusing. The art throughout the series is nice, featuring many different characters with distinct features. The English dubbing is passable, but slightly dry. This makes it more enjoyable to view the series in its original Japanese with subtitles.

Chobits has been a classic series since it was first released almost a decade ago. The blu-ray collection is nice and compact, while containing everything that made the series great. The best special feature is the Chibits animated short staring Sumomo and Kotoko. It is light and humorous, providing a nice six-minute story.

Like many animes, parents should watch the series prior to allowing their children to view it.  

 
Review by Sam Hayes