Jungle
The Mountain Between Us

The Mountain Between Us

Movie
Director(s): 
Genre: 
In Theatres: 
Oct 06, 2017
Grade:
C
Running Time: 
113 minutes

Nothing brings people closer together quite like a tragedy, especially one where your entire survival depends each other. The Mountain Between Us stars Idris Elba and Kate Winslet as two strangers who end up in a plane crash and become stranded in the icy wilderness. While the film could have been an interesting story of survival ala The Grey, it instead decides to focus more on the romance between the two and ends up coming across as somewhat trite and over the top.

 

Alex Martin (Kate Winslet) is a photojournalist who is trying to get home in time for her wedding, but a upcoming storm has delayed all flights out of the airport. Likewise, Dr. Ben Bass (Idris Elba) is a surgeon who needs to get back to his hospital for an important surgery the following day. Rather than simply wait around until the next flight, Alex decides to charter a small plane before the storm hits. Overhearing Ben’s predicament, she decides to invite him along as well. Their plan goes smoothly at first but when the pilot has a heart attack mid-flight, the plane ends up crashing in the middle of the snowy mountains with nothing but the vast wilderness as far as the eye can see.

 

The Mountain Between Us starts off as a rather intriguing survival story as Ben and Alex, along with the pilots adorable dog, are left to fend for themselves in the freezing cold. After the plane crash, it’s just the two of them for the majority of the entire film. To the film’s benefit, both Idris Elba and Kate Winslet are great together and definitely carry the film by themselves. Even though the film devolves into this sappy romance story, it could have been far worse if it didn’t have such commanding leads.

 

The first three quarters of The Mountain Between Us are actually rather decent as the two struggle to survive. My thoughts immediately went to “Please don’t eat the dog” though, and thankfully animal lovers can rest easy knowing that they do not eat the dog. Where the film falters is in the romantic relationship between Ben and Alex. It fails to establish their affection for each other well enough. The embers are definitely there, but they are quickly extinguished before any real fire builds between them. All the romance near the end of the film feels hollow as a result.

 

The last quarter of the film feels like an ending out of a Nicholas Sparks novel. It feels out of place compared to the rest of the film, especially given how intense some of the moments are of them just trying to survive. It’s a weird dichotomy that just doesn’t work. The Mountain Between Us gets off to a decent start, but things quickly break down and they’re just too insurmountable to overcome in the end.

Matt Rodriguez
Review by Matt Rodriguez
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